Automotive – Mobile Geeks http://www.mobilegeeks.com Covering the Latest Mobile Technology News Wed, 12 Dec 2018 08:00:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 39846093 What is edge computing? http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/what-is-edge-computing/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/what-is-edge-computing/#respond Mon, 03 Dec 2018 14:14:56 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=39124

Wikipedia defines Edge Computing as “pushing the frontier of computing applications, data, and services away from centralized nodes to the logical extremes of a network. It enables analytics and data gathering to occur at the source of the data. This approach requires leveraging resources that may not be continuously connected to a network such as […]

The post What is edge computing? appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

Wikipedia defines Edge Computing as “pushing the frontier of computing applications, data, and services away from centralized nodes to the logical extremes of a network. It enables analytics and data gathering to occur at the source of the data. This approach requires leveraging resources that may not be continuously connected to a network such as laptops, smartphones, tablets and sensors.”

Basically, it refers to the computing that you’re going to do with your data before it gets to the cloud. Computing on the edge of the cloud.

If you didn’t already know, the cloud it’s a magical place up in the sky where your data lives, it’s actually a set of servers somewhere. So when you send stuff to the cloud, you’re just sending it to some else’s computer.

The reason edge computing has caught on is that it’s faster if some of the computing is done on the device before it heads to the cloud.

Let’s take the ever so popular smart speaker, when you ask it a question, it has to send that question to a server, the server figures out the response, and send it back to you.

Edge Computing is allow your smart speaker to be able to handle more of the task so that there is less being sent to and from the cloud.

This is a pretty simple example, the potential of edge computing is the creation of a bridge between the digital and physical world and will be the foundation of the industrial internet.

How did we get to Edge Computing?

We are firmly in the era of cloud computing. Most people will use a centralized cloud based service like dropbox, gmail, or slack. You also have devices that are powered by content and intelligence that’s in the cloud, things like your Apple TV, Google chromecast or amazon echo.

What’s even more impressive is that massive number of companies rely on the infrastructure, hosting, machine learning and compute power from just a handful of companies like Amazon, Microsoft, Google and IBM.

Private clouds took 47% of the market last year, that’s companies like Apple, Facebook or Dropbox.

So, What is the Edge?

Edge in this context refers to the geography, the action is happening away from servers, on the edge. Edge Computing is computing that is done at or near the source of the data, rather than in the cloud aka the data centers located miles away.

Why do we want Edge Computing?

Edge computing will speed things up, is computer a needs to ask computer b something, it has to send that question halfway around the world and back again with a response. The time this take is latency, Multiplayer video games have done a lot of work to mitigate the true and perceived delay between shooting at someone and knowing that you missed.

Voice assistance can be the most frustrating, when you ask a question and you have to wait for a response. Your Echo has to process your speech, send a compressed version to the cloud, the cloud uncompressed it, then processes it, depending on what you’ve asked it it might have to access an API to figure out the weather, then it has to compress it at sent it back to you to tell you that you might need an umbrella today.

This is why companies are working on AI chips, so that your devices rely less on the cloud. For a company like Amazon it would save them server costs if they were less busy processing requests or doing your kids math homework.
The other advantage is that if enough of the work is done locally, you could end up with more privacy.. if the company giving you the services thinks it’s a good idea.

We have edge computing in our lives already, the industry has just run out of ways of making the cloud sound new, which is why Edge Computing has become the new “It’ term.

Looking at security our phones have been providing edge compute for years. When you make a payment on your phone and you’re asked to verify your biometric information. There are lots of security concerns for centralizing security.

Security isn’t the only way that edge computing will help solve the problems IoT introduced. The other hot example I see mentioned a lot by edge proponents is the bandwidth savings enabled by edge computing.

For instance, if you buy one security camera, you can probably stream all of its footage to the cloud. If you buy a dozen security cameras, you have a bandwidth problem. But if the cameras are smart enough to only save the “important” footage and discard the rest, your internet pipes are saved.
Almost any technology that’s applicable to the latency problem is applicable to the bandwidth problem. Running AI on a user’s device instead of all in the cloud seems to be a huge focus for Apple and Google right now.

We’re also seeing progressive web apps that are embracing the edge when they have offline first functionality. This means that you can open a website on your phone with an internet connection, do some work, save your changes locally, and sync with the cloud when it’s convenient for you.

Self Driving Cars and the Edge

Self Driving cars are the ultimate example of edge computing. Due to latency, privacy, and bandwidth, you can’t feed all the numerous sensors of a self-driving car up to the cloud and wait for a response. Your trip can’t survive that kind of latency, and even if it could, the cellular network is too inconsistent to rely on it for this kind of work.

But cars also represent a full shift away from user responsibility for the software they run on their devices. A self-driving car almost has to be managed centrally. It needs to get updates from the manufacturer automatically, it needs to send processed data back to the cloud to improve the algorithm, and the nightmare scenario of a self-driving car botnet makes the toaster and dishwasher botnet we’ve been worried about look like a Disney movie.

Edge computing is just beginning to gain mainstream recognition. What do you think? Is this next buzzword justified? And do you feel like you’ve got a solid grasp of the basics from this article?

The post What is edge computing? appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/what-is-edge-computing/feed/ 0 39124
Learn how Bosch came to make eBikes & how the LAPD is using them http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/learn-how-bosch-came-to-make-ebikes-how-the-lapd-is-using-them/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/learn-how-bosch-came-to-make-ebikes-how-the-lapd-is-using-them/#respond Sun, 02 Dec 2018 12:36:23 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=39100

Game-changing innovation sometimes starts with a small company that hits upon a big idea. Other times, it comes from a big company with a small idea. When I say big, I mean big. 400,000 employees big. This company that has been a leader in automotive technology for more than a century. Today, we present the […]

The post Learn how Bosch came to make eBikes & how the LAPD is using them appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

Game-changing innovation sometimes starts with a small company that hits upon a big idea. Other times, it comes from a big company with a small idea. When I say big, I mean big. 400,000 employees big. This company that has been a leader in automotive technology for more than a century.

Today, we present the story of how Germany company Bosch tiptoed into the once-quirky category of electric bicycles.

At LA CoMotion I caught up with Claudia Wasko, Vice President and General Manager of Bosch eBike Systems Americas. She gave me the inside scoop on how the eBike became a thing at Bosch.

Have you heard the European folktale about the “7 mile shoe”? It is about a shoe that allows the wearer to travel 7 miles in a single step. A decade ago, Peter Kimmich, a Bosch engineer, wanted to make this for bicycles.

To do this he had to overcome the engineering problems that plagued eBikes and convince Bosch to get on board.

Early electric bicycles were odd-looking, and didn’t sell. There were problems with overheating, with battery life, with climbing hills. Parts would break down, and retailers who’d have to deal with pissed off customers. Some eBikes were a little scary because it felt like the motor was in charge instead of the rider.

Wasko admits that she wouldn’t have bought an early eBike, “They just weren’t cool”.

The birth of the Bosch eBike came from a Bosch auto part, the power steering motor. This part was intended to improve the way the motor boosted the driver’s input when turning the wheel, but car companies weren’t buying as many as predicted.

Another cycling enthusiast and engineer at Bosch was toying around with the idea that their lithium ion batteries used for power tools could be re-purposed for the eBike. The two men poked around the vast stockpile in what they looked at as the “Bosch toolbox” to create an eBike.

The torque sensor was the next piece of the puzzle. In a car, this sensors can tell whether the weight in the passenger seat came from a human or heavy bag of groceries. It decides if the car triggers the alarm to remind the passenger to use their seat belt.

On an eBike, the sensor could be rigged so that the motor would subtly provide extra assistance on hills; on flats, it would back off. Whereas earlier eBikes could give riders a jolting sensation, the Bosch system allowed riders to feel more like they were riding a normal bike. A “tailwind feel” is what Bosch calls it.

Now that they had all the parts, it was on to designing the eBike. They couldn’t just strap the parts to an existing bike frame and Bosch had no experience designing bike equipment. They needed a partner. Wasko took the idea to the streets looking for companies to design frame concepts for the Bosch system.

In 2010 Bosch introduced their innovation at the EuroBike tradeshow, 14 companies had prototypes on display.

LAPD Adopts eBikes!

Fast forward to today, at La CoMotion, a future of mobility conference held in Los Angeles. The LAPD (Los Angeles Police Department) talked about how the design and roll out of their eBike customized for law enforcement.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck’s worked with several bike manufactures before settling on a system based on Bosch. He found theirs to be the most reliable with no failures during the test rides. Next he searched for a partner to design an eBike suited for law enforcement. Bosch introduced him to several OEM partners, ultimately, they selected Bulls USA. After 9 months of collaboration the “The Sentinel,” a custom-built eBike created to match the LAPD’s design specifications, was born.

A bicycle designed for law enforcement has different requirements that something an enthusiast might ride. The bike needs to be extremely rugged. It has to be fast enough to pursue a car despite having to carry a lot of police gear. The seat height needed to be adjusted to compensate for their utility belt should they need to dismount the bike and take a ready stance with their firearm.

In August 20 eBikes hit the streets of LA and the community response has been overwhelmingly positive. They have become a conversation starter and are improving the LAPD’s relationship with the community. It is one of the reasons a few cops have looked at joining the Bike division.

Not only have the bikes been good for relations but ticketing has increased 200% by the police using the eBikes compared to their ticketing rate on regular bikes.

“With a boost from an electric motor, officers can ride further and longer than they can on a standard bicycle, allowing them to expand their patrol area and cover more ground,” said Wasko ”Officers are still able to get into tight places and crowds, but now they can get there even faster. When a call comes in, an officer can easily adjust the assist level into Turbo and quickly pedal up to 28 mph – that’s comparable with top Tour de France pro rider speeds on flat terrain, and 9 to 10 mph faster than an average rider!”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by HED (@hollywoodentertainmentdistrict) on

Bike officers regularly cover over 60 Miles per day and they don’t charge their bikes during their shift. It takes about 2 hours to charge up the battery and should they need to, they could top up over lunch, or swap out the battery.

What do the Bike Cops Think?

Sergeant Gordon Helper, who works for the LAPD’s Central Division, has been part of the LAPD Bike program since 2000, noted “they have always had a bit of charge left the end of every shift, so battery life hasn’t been an issue”.

While using the eBikes, he received a call about a person with a knife and was able to respond quickly.

“I responded on the eBike from Central Station in the middle of the day in heavy traffic,” Helper said. “While obeying all traffic lights and signals, I still had less than a four-minute response. The average patrol car time is seven minutes.”

According to Helper, when he rides the eBikes, he doesn’t even feel the strain from the 30 pounds of department-mandated gear he carries. The eBikes have enabled him “to respond to any call for service quickly and efficiently.”

He told another story of a female bike cop getting hit by a car while responding to a call and remaining upright on the bike despite the back tire of the bike receiving severe damage. The move was so impressive a gallery of bike couriers cheered her recovery from the accident.

Bulls USA took a short video of Sergeant Helper talking about his experience patrolling with The Sentinel.

There are 8 other police departments in the US that are using eBikes based on the Bosch eBike Platform. The LAPD has been showing off their investment to the LA Fire Department, who couldn’t help but be a little jealous.

Bosch believes its power systems helped jumpstart the eBike business. In the U.S, ebike sales doubled between 2016 and 2017, reaching $77 million. In much of Europe, eBikes are even more popular. In Germany, for example, nearly 20% of bikes sold are electric, and analysts predict that will soon increase to one-in-three. Global eBike sales are expected to grow 6.3% annually through 2025.

We’ve been in touch with Bulls USA about reviewing their consumer offering of eBikes based on the Bosch eBike platform, so stay tuned to find out if we agree with the LAPD!

This post was sponsored by Bosch, All thoughts and ideas are still my own.

The post Learn how Bosch came to make eBikes & how the LAPD is using them appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/learn-how-bosch-came-to-make-ebikes-how-the-lapd-is-using-them/feed/ 0 39100
Fully Electric Smart Takes on Being Green in Scandinavia http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/fully-electric-smart-takes-on-being-green-in-scandinavia/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/fully-electric-smart-takes-on-being-green-in-scandinavia/#respond Thu, 04 Oct 2018 23:52:21 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=38577

Denmark is on its way to being CO2 neutral by 2025 achieving this goal means going electric. SMART brought me to Copenhagen to drive their Fully Electric Smart around through an ecosystem that taken electrification to the next level. Copenhagen is a city of 1.3M and it’s working on being one of the most cycle-friendly […]

The post Fully Electric Smart Takes on Being Green in Scandinavia appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

Denmark is on its way to being CO2 neutral by 2025 achieving this goal means going electric. SMART brought me to Copenhagen to drive their Fully Electric Smart around through an ecosystem that taken electrification to the next level.

Copenhagen is a city of 1.3M and it’s working on being one of the most cycle-friendly cities in the world and going electric is at the center of the movement. Last year Denmark reached a tipping point where they had more electric charging stations then they did petrol stations. Their commitment to going electric is being realized.

Most European countries already have quite an extensive public charging network, and a road trip to visit a summer house isn’t an impossibility anymore. Here’s a short overview on charging infrastructure development for all you statistics lovers.

Nordic countries, including Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and Iceland, have one of the highest ratios of EV’s per capita in the world. Four out of these five countries already have a market share above 2%, with Norway leading the way with the highest market share level in the world.

By the end of 2017, approximately 250 000 electric cars had been registered in the Nordic countries. The number of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) outlets was more than 260 000. Most of these charging points locate at residential buildings or workplaces and over 16 000 are public.

In the fully electric Smart FourTWO I drove around Denmark and tested the charging system. We were armed with all the local payment cards and whenever we went looking for a charging station we had no problem hooking up and charging our car. Even when I wanted to top up over lunch I was able to get a changing station right next to the restaurant.

Like many cities, digital payment systems for parking have started rolling out. EasyPark was our app of choice in Copenhagen and like most parking apps as a tourist or visitor it’s really not more convenient than just finding a machine on the street and putting some money in. As someone who visits a lot of cities looking for parking, being able to find lots on a map is great. However, the sign-up process means you need WiFi or a phone number that works perfectly on their network. Someone traveling may not have access to the same services as a local. The GPS positioning in often incorrect is city centers thanks to the tall buildings, EasyPark makes you select where your car is. In our case, it wasn’t correct so we ended up getting a ticket even though we paid for parking. Street signs being a foreign language and the apps often don’t incorporate real-time parking rules so figuring out if your parking legally is still a problem.

GoBoat is all electric, 80% of the rentals are from locals getting out and enjoying their seafaring roots. In the summer reservations are long. The boats themselves are made of recycled materials and they’ve actually lowered the speed since the point of getting on the water is to socialize, sightseeing is an added bonus. The boats are powered by an environmentally friendly electrical engine from Torqeedo, which uses batteries that are charged by solar cells on the roof of the pavilion.

If you thought electric boats were neat, wait until you see the electric ferry that travels between Denmark and Sweden. Ferries are a perfect place to start if you’re looking to create an electric transportation system on the water. They often travel only short distances and stay for relatively long periods of time at the same ports, where they can be charged.

The HH Ferries Group’s two ferries, the Tycho Brahe and the Aurora, operate a 4-km (2.5 miles) ferry route between Helsingborg (Sweden) and Helsingör (Denmark). Therefore, the route that they are converting to all-electric transport is not exactly impressive, but that shouldn’t take away from the ships themselves, which are really something.

They are 238 meters long (780 ft) and weight 8,414 tonnes. They carry 7.4 million passengers and 1.9 million vehicles annually.
This pair consumes the highest amount of green energy from the grid. The city had to make an investment into these ferry’s going green, they had to lay 3km of cables to the port to make it happen. The infrastructure demands of such a project exist in an ecosystem, one single point can’t decide to be electric, the infrastructure has to be in place.

It takes 20min to pass back and forth between the piers takes 20minutes and they have 8min and 12min to recharge on either side. This means they need to move a lot of power very quickly to the batteries that sit on top of the boat. They can do two runs on one charge just in case something goes wrong on one end and when you see how they’re charged you can see there was a lot of room for error.

ABB has 2 robots arms that attach the charging ports, it was a massive undertaking to get these to work since the boat is a moving target and they’re typically running in a factory where targets are static.

The energy supplied is from wind, water and solar and the cells are changed leaving the battery intact to minimize the environmental impact.

Everything I’d experienced so far was a part of a plan laid 25 years ago when Copenhagen was on the verge of bankruptcy. Three major projects brought the city back to life, the metro, terminal 3 and the Øresund Bridge between Copenhagen and Malmo.

Copenhagen and Malmo have a combined population of 3.8M and consider themselves to be a cross-national region. People from Malmo commute to Copenhagen as the salaries are high in Denmark and the cost of living lower in Malmo. The bridge created a new economic zone expanding the capacity and capabilities of Copenhagen while undertaking a project that created jobs.

Small countries can be first movers their size and population make them agile. Testing out the sustainable infrastructure, I saw some pain points, how do you limit charging time to make sure everyone gets a turn. I never encountered a charging plug that didn’t have at least one free space, but Denmark choose the egg before the chicken. They built the infrastructure and are now just waiting for the rest of us to catch up.

Smart sponsored our travel to participate in this tour around Scandinavia, all thoughts and ideas are our own. 

The post Fully Electric Smart Takes on Being Green in Scandinavia appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/fully-electric-smart-takes-on-being-green-in-scandinavia/feed/ 0 38577
Everything you need to know about BMW’s Self Driving Motorcycle http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/everything-you-need-to-know-about-bmws-self-driving-motorcycle/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/everything-you-need-to-know-about-bmws-self-driving-motorcycle/#respond Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:55:37 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=38423

When the death rate of a motorcyclist is 28 times higher than someone behind the wheel of a car, it’s clear the role of a self driving bike is to make the activity safer and not to recreate a modern headless horseman. Motorcycles face unique challenges and BMW Mottorad has been working on this technology […]

The post Everything you need to know about BMW’s Self Driving Motorcycle appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

When the death rate of a motorcyclist is 28 times higher than someone behind the wheel of a car, it’s clear the role of a self driving bike is to make the activity safer and not to recreate a modern headless horseman.

Motorcycles face unique challenges and BMW Mottorad has been working on this technology for 2 years.

The plan isn’t to sell a fully self-driving motorcycle. Instead, BMW says it wants to add aspects of the tech into its motorcycles to offer more stability in critical riding situations. Cars are getting driver assist features like automatic emergency braking or lane keep, BMW is looking to integrate similar tech to cut down on the most avoidable accidents.

Translating these kinds of driver assistance features to a motorcycle is a challenge. You can program a car to slam on the brakes to avoid a crash, and the driver will (likely) come out just fine. But if you do that on a motorcycle, the rider would go flying off the bike. Given the level of control motorcycle riders have over the balance of their bikes, even subtle automated corrections could create new danger.

Something else to consider is the changing footprint of the bike, it had a lean angle when it turns which changes the amount of space the bike takes up on the road. This isn’t just another variable to take into consideration it changes the bounding box, this is the calculation that determines the size around an object required to keep it safe. This dimension does not really change for a car, but take the lean angle of the bike into consideration and very quickly the object on the road needs a lot more space to keep it safe.

When the bike leans to the right or left it changes the surface area that the bike occupies on the road, this is a variable that doesn’t really change for a car.

The idea of a variable bounding box isn’t just a consideration for automated features on a bike, it’s a consideration that cars need to take into account as they begin to drive themselves.

The acceleration of a bike is higher and the normal behavior of a rider is different. Weaving in traffic and changing lanes is different in cars than it is in bikes. If you take an extreme of a commercial vehicle the normal behavior is harder to handle or predict, if a truck never leaves a mine, it’s easy to predict and deal with its normal behavior.

The information produced by a car is also different, door open vs door closed and the bike will send a lean angle because this changes, very quickly, the bounding box or the projected footprint on the car changes. Cars consistently have the same footprint unless the doors open, it stays the same, but when I bike leans it now takes up a larger portion of the road. This type of information needs to be taken into consideration when we create standards for the types of information that are created, included and considered important.

We need Vehicle-to-Vehicle Communication NOT Car-to-Car

If you’ve been following along with the field of self-driving cars you’ll be aware of the struggles of standardizing Car to Car communication. BMW Mottorad is raising awareness around the special needs of the motorcycle, the automotive industry isn’t waiting around for the motorcycle industry to get its act together to move forward on standards.

If the motorcycle industry wasn’t stepping up to take a seat at the table there would be no way to transmit the lean angle because the car industry wants the angle of the steering wheel. On a bike you brake with your hand and your foot, BMW is creating the data that the industry needs to take the bike into consideration when it creates standards for future communication and infrastructure.

It’s clear that autonomous, V2V and self-driving features will begin in the car, the technology isn’t miniaturized yet if you look at cars the data loggers and computers took up the whole trunk, motorcycles don’t have that luxury.

The CMC (Connected Motorcycle Consortium) s creating standards for the car and motorcycle ecosystem. It’s is active in making sure that the steps that are being taken aren’t excluding the motorcycle.

What is BMW Mottorad really showing off today?

It’s impressive, we won’t take away anything from the demo, but we’re not actually seeing a self-driving bike, we are seeing a bike follow a GPS track it doesn’t have any environment sensors. In addition to telling the bike where the track is, they had to set track parameters, for example, it’s width and composition before it heads out to drive itself around the track.

The three containers are full of raw development, it’s a combination of equipment they picked up at their local electronics shop, their racing workbench with a few custom bits for good measure. The total extra weight is 70kg.

What is actively being calculated in the video is the bike stabilization. The turning and stabilizing of the bike is an exciting feature that could be added to a bike used to teach people to ride.

They are hoping to also provide guidance for object avoidance, they can start to figure out what’s the best angle or way to stay safe in certain situations. The end goal is not to sell self-driving bikes but to create assistance systems that can help reduce the risk.

BMW isn’t planning on releasing a self-driving bike, but a project like this is important to raise the awareness around the motorcycles special needs. And to amaze us with the erry footage of a driverless bike zipping around a track.

The post Everything you need to know about BMW’s Self Driving Motorcycle appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/everything-you-need-to-know-about-bmws-self-driving-motorcycle/feed/ 0 38423
6 ways Insurance will change because of Autonomous Cars http://www.mobilegeeks.com/6-ways-insurance-will-change-autonomous-cars/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/6-ways-insurance-will-change-autonomous-cars/#respond Fri, 07 Sep 2018 16:52:42 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?p=38390

When it comes to assigning blame, few traffic accidents are clear-cut cases. Cars are getting smarter, drivers are turning into passengers, and we’re left with the many questions. How will the insurance industry evolve to manage the risk of self-driving cars and what will this mean for businesses and individuals? The insurance industry is about […]

The post 6 ways Insurance will change because of Autonomous Cars appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

When it comes to assigning blame, few traffic accidents are clear-cut cases. Cars are getting smarter, drivers are turning into passengers, and we’re left with the many questions. How will the insurance industry evolve to manage the risk of self-driving cars and what will this mean for businesses and individuals?

The insurance industry is about to undergo a major transformation and car insurance is at the center of this change.

Home insurance, health insurance, insurance for your business if you think about it there isn’t an industry the insurance industry doesn’t touch in some way. It wasn’t my fault, honest: Insuring next-generation vehicles a panel during SHIFT Automotive through their discussion we heard 5 ways insurance will change because of the self driving car.

1. Individual insurance rates will decrease

The point of self-driving cars is to make the roads safer, as accidents decrease the need for insurance payouts will decrease and our rates will follow suit.

we don’t need to wait for fully autonomous cars to hit the streets to see a reduction in accidents. Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) are becoming commonplace, and they show significant potential to decrease crashes.

ADAS will become increasingly common as the technology becomes less expensive and older vehicles are replaced. By 2025, as many as 40% of cars may have systems such as lane change alerts and forward collision prevention.

Many insurers already offer premium discounts for these features, but as the effects of increased safety become apparent, insurers will need to lower premiums or risk being undercut by competitors.

Rates will be weighted more to the risk profile of the vehicle than the risk profile of the driver, which is the reverse of what we see today

2. Digital Twins Will Infiltrate Insurance platforms

A digital twin is a highly complex virtual model that is the exact counterpart (or twin) of a physical thing. Many companies already have digital twins for all the trucks in their fleet and machines on their assembly line to predict when they fail. This trend will continue but the insurance companies may make it mandatory or become involved in the monitoring process.

Insurance is all about analyzing risk and if you have sensors in the things you’re insuring and can predict when they’ll break down, it seems natural you’d want digital twins of everything!

3. Infrastructure insurance will emerge a dominant trend

Cloud server systems, signals, and other safeguards that will be put in place to protect riders and drivers. The need to secure and insure the public infrastructure, but governments often “self-insure” these risks so the opportunity for commercial insurance is likely to be lower.

4. Product liability will become a focus for insurance companies

Auto-related sensors and chips are expensive, but the real risk for manufacturers is the potential for failure through software bugs, memory overflow, and algorithm defects, and the resulting massive liability.

5. Automakers will assume liability for self-driving cars

When a self-driving car has an accident and a human driver isn’t in control, the manufacturer has stepped up to assume liability. Just so you’re clear if you’re behind the wheel and there is an accident you’re going to need your own insurance. Google, Volvo, and Mercedes-Benz will accept liability in cases where a vehicle’s self-driving system is at fault for a crash.

Since there are no self-driving cars on the road, this is currently all talk, so we should expect a lot of lawsuits before precedents are set. Insurance companies may need to step in and require extra tracking sensors to be placed in cars to determine whether a human or AI driver was at fault in an accident before automakers will assume full liability for crashes.

6. Automotive manufacturers become the insurance providers.

Why outsource a business when you can bring it in-house, we may see the acquisition or merger or insurance companies with the manufactures.

After all why partner with a lucrative business when you could just own it?

Insurance wasn’t the only talk at SHIFT Automotive that got us thinking about the future of the industry and how all industries will be affected by the ways that information and the people who use it move through the world.

 

The post 6 ways Insurance will change because of Autonomous Cars appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/6-ways-insurance-will-change-autonomous-cars/feed/ 0 38390
VW launched a car with night vision headlights http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/vw-touareg-2019-led-matrix-headlights-night-vision/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/vw-touareg-2019-led-matrix-headlights-night-vision/#respond Thu, 16 Aug 2018 11:00:54 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=38251

Volkswagen is launching I.Q.LIGHT – LED Matrix Headlamps in the 2019 Touareg. The adaptive matrix headlamps will employ targeted control of up to 128 LEDs to provide precise and optimal light distribution and luminous intensity. The LED Matrix Headlamps will enhance safety because they allow drivers to recognize road details and possible obstacles at night […]

The post VW launched a car with night vision headlights appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

Volkswagen is launching I.Q.LIGHT – LED Matrix Headlamps in the 2019 Touareg. The adaptive matrix headlamps will employ targeted control of up to 128 LEDs to provide precise and optimal light distribution and luminous intensity.

The LED Matrix Headlamps will enhance safety because they allow drivers to recognize road details and possible obstacles at night earlier, giving them more time to respond.

Individually controlled LEDs blend into a matrix of light areas in, both, the high and low beam modules. The low beam employs a matrix of 48 LEDs positioned on a shared circuit board. The high beam circuit board uses 27 LEDs. Combined these 75 LEDs form the adaptive matrix light. 53 additional LEDs ensure that lighting functions can be shown, including the illumination in front of the vehicle, as well as the daytime running lights, the cornering lights, the position lights, and the direction indicators. In total, the front lamps of the new Touareg will use 256 LEDs.

The front digital camera will analyze the road conditions, spot oncoming vehicles, etc. And that data combined with GPS data, along with speed, and steering angles will go into selecting the LEDs in the matrix to provide the ideal headlamp illumination for the road and the surrounding area up ahead in less than a second.

In the Touareg, the LED Matrix Headlamp system performs the LED selection and illumination within the headlamp matrix automatically using “Dynamic Light Assist” to turn on and off the LEDs independently and adjust the lights to the current environment, topography, and traffic situation.

Through an aggregate of many different pieces of data, the car recognizes the driving location as on a city or a country road, on the highway, or off-road and will anticipate where other road users might currently be located. The very precise illumination of individual LEDs within the LED Matrix Headlamps ensures that the lights never produce glare.

The camera-based system reacts to signs by temporarily dimming the LEDs to avoids causing glare for Touareg drivers themselves. The camera even identifies reflections caused by rain-slicked roads and reduces them to avoid glare.

2019 Touareg Night Vision Explained

Night Vision is a new feature to arrive on the SUV which puts an infrared camera in the front of the car so you can see what’s in front of you at night.

The new Night Vision system is touted as being able to see people and animals up to 130 feet away. The camera display will be shown on the instrument panel and replace your normal speedometer and fuel gauge, and any detected creatures will be highlighted in yellow on the black and white screen. If those creatures then wander into the path of the car, they’ll be shown in red and labeled as a potential collision threat by the onboard computer.

This is when Night Vision kicks into high gear. Even if you don’t have the camera view displayed on your instrument panel, Night Vision will take over and show the thermal imaging view if it detects a threat. It’ll also ping an audible alert via the cabin speakers and immediately set the brakes to the highest possible setting.

However, all that happens only at speeds exceeding 31 mph. If you’re at 30 mph and below, the system doesn’t go into overdrive like that. Instead, it’ll just play the audible warning ping and a red light will pop up on the heads-up display.

Night Vision will also work with VW’s new “IQ.Light – LED matrix headlights,” which will flash an unwary pedestrian a warning signal if the system detects them in the threat zone at speeds above 37 mph.

This isn’t the only high tech feature on the 2019 Touareg, it’s got a whole new Infotainment system which we’re eager to check out!!

The post VW launched a car with night vision headlights appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/vw-touareg-2019-led-matrix-headlights-night-vision/feed/ 0 38251
How the Audi e-tron Electric Car Drives the extra mile – Recuperation Braking Explained http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/audi-e-tron-electric-car-drives-extra-mile-recuperation-braking-explained/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/audi-e-tron-electric-car-drives-extra-mile-recuperation-braking-explained/#respond Wed, 08 Aug 2018 16:53:52 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=38140

Running of juice is one of the biggest fears around purchasing electric cars, but if your car can go further on a single charge and the way you drive can help you achieve that, then we’re one step closer to having more people adopt them. When we peel the stickers of the Audi e-tron prototype […]

The post How the Audi e-tron Electric Car Drives the extra mile – Recuperation Braking Explained appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

Running of juice is one of the biggest fears around purchasing electric cars, but if your car can go further on a single charge and the way you drive can help you achieve that, then we’re one step closer to having more people adopt them.

When we peel the stickers of the Audi e-tron prototype we’re going to have the first fully electric car from Audi. We’ve taken a closer look at the virtual mirrors and what the interior will look like, now we’re going to dive into the electric engine.

The Audi e-tron offers strong performance, it’s electric system produces 300kW and can go from 0-100km/h in less than 6 seconds. In the WLTP test cycle this electric SUV can cover over 400km on a single charge. Thirty percent of the range is created by the recuperation system.

Mobile Geeks headed to 4,302m in Pikes Peak in Colorado to learn how the variable recuperation in the Audi e-tron prototype worked. Driving up the mountain if the car were to carry on with these driving conditions it would have been able to drive 167 more kilometers, going down the mountain the conditions are favorable for range, so we rose to 285km in predictive range. Though it appears we which means that for every kilometer driven we gained 3km of range, in reality, it’s 1km lost to basically 1km gained, the predictive range is making these estimates on the current drive pattern since HERE maps driving data isn’t available on pikes peak.

Audi claims one of their innovative recuperation concept bests their competitors and we are seeing an electrohydrautically integrated brake control system (iBRS) appear in a fully electric car for the very first time.

The Audi e-tron prototype recuperates energy with up to 300Nm of torque (221.3 lb-ft) and 220kW of electric power – more than 70% of its operating energy input.

How does the e-tron prototype recuperate energy?

Recuperation refers to the use of kinetic energy during deceleration.

On our drive down Pikes we were shown the two ways the e-tron was able to recuperate energy:

Coasting recuperation takes place when the driver’s foot releases the right-hand pedal and the car is moving down without the use of the engine.

Braking recuperation is when the driver depresses the brake pedal below 0.3g of pressure.

The iBRS is a variation of brake by wire, but there is no longer a wire in the traditional sense, the whole thing is connected with hydraulic pressure. You can think of the iBRS as a smart machine deciding when and how the electric motors come into play and when the traditional friction brakes should slow the car. As a driver, you won’t notice a difference in handling or braking between the traditional friction brakes and recuperation braking.

The iBRS has a hydraulic piston in the compact brake module, which generates additional pressure and thus additional brake force for the recuperation torque. To break it down you can think of a squash ball inside of a tube, when you press the brakes you increase the pressure inside the tube, and on the ball, this turns into energy the car can recuperate.

Up to 0.3 of g-force, the Audi e-tron prototype recuperates energy solely via the electric motors, without using the conventional brake. This covers over 90% of all decelerations.

If the brakes try to apply more than 0.3g of force the wheel brakes are applied because it’s implied that you’ll want to stop to avoid something. What’s interesting is that when the car figures out that you want to stop short, which can be in combination with the front camera, you’ll be able to stop 20% shorter to help avoid whatever is in your path.

When the system uses the engines for electric deceleration, the system uses the Quattro recuperation function, which decides which axle contributes to the recuperation and to what extent. The drive control unit figures out the ideal distribution of the recuperation torque between the two motors. In most cases, it will be the rear motor that is activated in order to achieve the highest efficiency.

There are three different recuperation modes that the driver can access: manual coasting recuperation uses the shift paddles, automatic coasting recuperation via the predictive efficiency assist, and brake recuperation with a smooth transition between electric and hydraulic deceleration.

The driver can select the degree of coasting recuperation in three stages using the paddles on the steering wheel. At the lowest stage, the vehicle coasts with no additional drag torque when the accelerator pedal is released. At the highest stage, you’ll feel the car notably slow down. Here are a few shots from the video, you can see the different levels in action, the driving style that goes along with them and in real time where the e-tron is recuperating energy.

Since Audi is all about driving performance this gives you the ability to control the braking using the engine directly using the steering wheel paddles. You can even control the deceleration using just the accelerator pedal. When you pull your foot off the “gas”, the car will slow down naturally. Audi is calling this the one-pedal feeling as there is no need to use the brake pedal in this deceleration scenario.

If you’re looking for more detail on how the e-tron manages the recuperations under different conditions these illustrations provide extra detail.

Predictive efficiency assist

Typically most drivers will let the car manage the energy consumption and recuperation. Predictive efficiency assist works together closely with adaptive cruise control or the adaptive cruise assist. It accesses predictive route data from navigation and Car-to-X information. The efficiency assist uses the front camera as well as data from the front and rear-facing radar sensors.

Mapping data is needed to plan the driving style, the front-facing cameras and radar don’t see far enough to be able to predict elevation changes. HERE provides the supporting mapping data, however, on the Pikes Peak drive this stretch of road did not have mapping data which is why the range forecasting based its estimations on driving style.

A look at the asynchronous electric motors

 

The e-tron prototype comes equipped with two electric motors, the main engine is on the rear axel, the secondary motor appears on the front axel. The two electric motors have an output of 265kW and develop 561Nm of torque. They can hold this peak performance for 60seconds. The e-tron is electronically limited to 200km/h and it can accelerate several times consecutively without output losses. The maximum drive torque is present within fractions of a second and provides enormous torque. By shifting from drive range D to S and fully depressing the right-hand pedal, the driver can activate boost mode. It is available for eight seconds. Here, the drive produces 300kW of system output and 664Nm (489.7 lb-ft) of torque. The Audi e-tron prototype sprints from 0 to 100km/h in less than six seconds.

The Brakes!

As we descended Pikes Peak there was a mandatory stop to check the temperature of the rotors since the drive requires a lot of braking. Our rotors measured in a just above ambient temperature!

Mobile Geeks will be at the launch of the e-tron in San Fransisco in mid September, so be sure to check back to find out everything you need to know about Audi’s first fully electric car.

The post How the Audi e-tron Electric Car Drives the extra mile – Recuperation Braking Explained appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/audi-e-tron-electric-car-drives-extra-mile-recuperation-braking-explained/feed/ 0 38140
Bosch looks to give self-driving cars hyperlocal weather reports http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/bosch-looks-to-give-self-driving-cars-hyperlocal-weather-reports/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/bosch-looks-to-give-self-driving-cars-hyperlocal-weather-reports/#respond Wed, 01 Aug 2018 08:05:53 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=38624

Autonomous cars run on data, the better the data, the better the car will be able to see the world. Bosch is looking to optimize its autonomous drive platform by integrating one of the hardest variables out there, the weather. With this new service, the German company wants to send weather and road conditions to […]

The post Bosch looks to give self-driving cars hyperlocal weather reports appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

Autonomous cars run on data, the better the data, the better the car will be able to see the world.

Bosch is looking to optimize its autonomous drive platform by integrating one of the hardest variables out there, the weather. With this new service, the German company wants to send weather and road conditions to autonomous vehicles to help them adapt and optimize their route selection.

We could see this on the roads as early as 2020. Bosch has partnered with Finnish company Foreca to deliver the hyper local weather information via the Bosch cloud. Data such as the current temperature, the current use of the windscreen wipers and the triggering of ABS and ASR from other vehicles in the area could also be collected and supplied. The weather reports will roll out first and will be followed the sensor data from the vehicles themselves to augment the information available in the cloud.

“Wet roads, snow, ice — with our predictive road-condition services, we alert to hazards before critical situations can develop. We are helped here by the weather data provided by our partner Foreca. This means an automated vehicle will know exactly where it can drive autonomously, and how,” says the Bosch management board member Dr. Dirk Hoheisel.

This also indirectly confirms that the new service will only be available for vehicles with manual steering capability (i.e. < level 4), so that the driver can intervene to correct when necessary.

What this actually means for the driver on the road is if you’re driving down a road and the encounters some ice under a tree or around a bridge, the car could detect a stability control intervention and compare it to the weather data. This information could be communicated to the Bosch cloud and other cars in the network would then be aware of the hazardous road conditions and pass over control to the driver around the specific area.

This service is urgently needed on the market. According to data from the FHA (Federal Highway Administration), 22% of every year in America are caused by poor weather conditions. The result is 6000 deaths a year.  The combination of weather reports and real time data are necessary to be effective. It would be easy for the lidar to get confused between a wet and icy road, weather data would be necessary to help determine what is being seen by the car.

Since 2016 companies have been trying to get the most out of existing hardware found in cars. Researchers at the University of Michigan equipped Ford cars with high-resolution 3D technology that can actually detect deteriorating weather conditions and adapt driving behavior. Waymo also announced last year that he would send his test vehicles to Michigan. According to CEO John Krafcik, the aim is to check how their own sensors perform in wet and cold environments.

In a world in which (partially) automated vehicles make up an ever greater proportion of daily road traffic, the new system will increase reliability and safety.

Bosch Connected Mobility Network

Earlier this year Bosch launched a new connected mobility division at Bosch World, it includes connected services such as in car payments for electric charging, keys that can be stored on smartphones and in-car alerts for obstacles like wrong-way drivers. Vehicle to X connectivity will allow wireless connections to exchange information between vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure. This will lay the foundation for the data based assistants and services of tomorrow, without the need for internet.

The weather alerts for vehicles falls under the connected services umbrella. Connectivity makes vehicles part of the integrated mobility solutions that also include services. It demonstrates a meaningful use of the vehicle generated data. The same platform is enabling community based parking. Passing cars use sensors to detect open spaces and share that information with the cloud. Drivers in search of parking space benefit from this real time information.

The connected mobility division also includes vehicle sharing & ridesharing. “Connectivity will fundamentally change how we get from A to B, and in the process it will help to solve today’s traffic problems. We are using it to realize our vision of emissions-free, stress-free, and accident-free mobility,” said Dr. Volkmar Denner, chairman of the Bosch board of management.

Connectivity offers tremendous business potential. By 2025, there will be more than 470 million connected vehicles on the world’s roads. We hope to see more examples like crowdsourced road conditions to improve safety on the roads.

To learn more about Bosch Connected Solutions please visit their website.

The post Bosch looks to give self-driving cars hyperlocal weather reports appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/bosch-looks-to-give-self-driving-cars-hyperlocal-weather-reports/feed/ 0 38624
Here is what the interior of future Audi Electric Cars Looks Like http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/interior-future-audi-electric-cars-looks-like/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/interior-future-audi-electric-cars-looks-like/#respond Sun, 08 Jul 2018 16:19:46 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=37934

The Audi E-Tron is technically a prototype but if you peel off the stickers it will suddenly turn into a production-ready vehicle that will be hitting the streets by the end of the year. The design language that you’ll find in this car will carry down through all of Audi’s future electric vehicles so it’s […]

The post Here is what the interior of future Audi Electric Cars Looks Like appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

The Audi E-Tron is technically a prototype but if you peel off the stickers it will suddenly turn into a production-ready vehicle that will be hitting the streets by the end of the year. The design language that you’ll find in this car will carry down through all of Audi’s future electric vehicles so it’s worth taking a deep dive on the E-Tron.

The E-Tron interior screams futuristic, but it’s not so far out there that we can’t imagine living in it. There are five screens surrounding you, the fully digital instrument cluster, the infotainment system, and the touchscreen mounted lower on the center console for the climate control settings as seen in high-end Audis like the A8, Q8, A7, and A6. The final two screen are OLED displays mounted in the doors showing acting as the virtual mirrors.

Virtul Mirror – Tech for Tech or a Good Idea?

In many ways, it’s even more of a technology hub than Audi’s modern vehicles. The virtual mirrors see to that. Not only do they eliminate your blind spot or turn them down to see the curb while parking, invaluable if you have expensive rims that you don’t want scratching the curb. Those are both nice addons but that’s not really the big added value, it’s about putting them in the real world so Audi’s engineers can start to gather data on how the cameras could be used for autonomous drive, smart city infrastructure and to develop better use cases for virtual mirrors in your car.

The president has also already been set with the rear camera, this has become such an invaluable tool that those who always had one are hard pressed to drive without it. It’s easy to make a case that having a single panoramic video view may be an improvement over the combination of old and new technology now deployed in cars that use a rearview camera and traditional side mirrors.

Sometimes cool technology is nice to have, but in other cases, it can be about beginning the discussion for legalization and pushing development. The E-Tron will be the first car to launch with virtual mirrors as an option. They won’t be legal all over the world, but you will be able to get them in Germany.

The mirrors not only change the driving experience inside the car, but they also affect its performance.

To tell you a bit about the heart of the Audi E-Tron it’s a pair of electric motors providing a combined output of 355 horsepower (265 kilowatts) for a sprint to 62 mph (100 kph) in less than 6 seconds and a top speed of about 200 kph (124 mph). Using the automatic transmission selector to enable Sport mode will offer a temporary maximum power of 402 hp (300 kW).

The Belgium-built electric crossover will rely on a 95-kWh battery with enough juice for approximately 400 km (248.5 miles) in the WLTP cycle, which will be possible partly thanks to the E-Tron’s aerodynamic body with a drag coefficient of just 0.28. The low Cd number was achieved by replacing the bulky mirrors with the tiny cameras, thus making the vehicle narrower by 15 centimeters (5.9 inches). These virtual mirrors will be offered as optional equipment,

If you’re wondering how fast you’ll be able to charge it, using a 150-kW high-voltage charger will “fill up” the pack in just 30 minutes while with a 400-volt three-phase outlet it will take approximately 8 hours and 30 minutes.

The inside is otherwise as posh as you’d expect from a modern Audi, with soft surfaces everywhere, plenty of optional illumination and a 705W, 16-speaker Bang & Olufsen audio system There is a clever touch in the driving mode selector, though — the “gear” lever doubles as a hand rest. Audi is promising “top-class” room for five people and their cargo, thanks in no small part to the absence of the usual tunnel at the back.

Be sure to weigh in on what you do and don’t like…maybe even influence the design decision of future cars. Since we know for a fact the engineers at Audi are regularly creeping the comments on our humble blog.

The post Here is what the interior of future Audi Electric Cars Looks Like appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/interior-future-audi-electric-cars-looks-like/feed/ 0 37934
How Emergency Assist in an Audi works http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/emergency-assist-audi-works/ http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/emergency-assist-audi-works/#respond Fri, 06 Jul 2018 19:55:02 +0000 http://www.mobilegeeks.com/?post_type=article&p=37892

Emergency Assist in cars isn’t new, but for Audi the way their cars deal with a sleepy or unresponsive driver changed with the launch of the technology powerhouse, the Audi A8. Every car since comes with the same philosophy for waking the driver and bringing the car to a complete stop. It might seem like common […]

The post How Emergency Assist in an Audi works appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>

Emergency Assist in cars isn’t new, but for Audi the way their cars deal with a sleepy or unresponsive driver changed with the launch of the technology powerhouse, the Audi A8. Every car since comes with the same philosophy for waking the driver and bringing the car to a complete stop.

It might seem like common sense for all car manufacturers to deal with Emergency Assistance in the same way, but actually, there is no legislation on what a car should do when offering this assistance. So it seems automakers are dealing with it differently, which is why I thought it was worth documenting all the different ways a car can safely deal with an emergency. Last year in a Mercedes after a series of warnings the car just decided that it had told me enough at 50kph to take control and disabled the assisted driving function and drove the car off the road. Now, I get that I’m supposed to be ready to take control, but the car should have come to a stop. It was enough of a scare that now I check to see how manufacturers try to get me to take control, should I dose off.

If you’re too lazy to watch my amazing video, after 30sec of taking my hands off the wheel the car makes a sound (a noticeable sound, but not a resounding ring that would wake me from my slumber. It’s worth watching the video since you can barely hear the sound of me commenting on what’s happening in the car. A screen flashes up just before the sound asking me to take control of the car. Approximately 15-20 seconds later the car “bings” again, but this time is lightly an rapidly taps on the brakes to try to shake me awake. As I don’t take the wheel the car continues to decelerate and tightens my seatbelt quite aggressively and the car comes to a smooth stop. The interior lights come on, the doors unlock and (to my surprise) the car calls an emergency number and someone offers me assistance.

What’s interesting about this approach is that not all manufacturers think that it’s a good idea to tap on the brakes. Mercedes believes that this is potentially dangerous as the car has no idea what’s going on around it. I’d argue that me being asleep at the wheel and no one in control of the car is more dangerous than letting the car try to help me.

What do you guys think? I’ll be testing the A-Class later this month to see if alongside their new MBUX infotainment system Mercedes has reconsidered their stance. What do you guys think? Let me know in the comments!

The post How Emergency Assist in an Audi works appeared first on Mobile Geeks.

]]>
http://www.mobilegeeks.com/article/emergency-assist-audi-works/feed/ 0 37892